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Composite Concrete-CLT Floor Systems for Tall Building Design

Timeline: 
( ? )

Project Lead: Christopher Higgins

This project will optimize the strength, stiffness, vibration characteristics, and acoustic qualities of cross-laminated floor systems utilizing a composite concrete and cross-laminated timber product. This project includes development, testing and optimization of an economical shear connector (to connect the CLT panel to the concrete slab) that will be compared with existing screw and steel plate solutions. The resulting prototype floor system will be tested at full scale.

Mass Plywood Panel Product Development Testing

Timeline: 
2016 - 2019
Project Lead: Arijit Sinha
Abstract: MPP, like CLT, can be used as a substitute for traditional building materials, providing much lower embodied energy and greater carbon sequestering properties than concrete and steel. Freres Lumber Company in Lyons, Oregon says that some advantages of MPP are that it uses 20-30 percent less wood than CLT. Large-format panels can be manufactured at the production facility in order to minimize waste and labor on job sites. The light weight of the panels can help save on transportation costs and logistics during construction

Seismic Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber and Cross-Laminated Timber-Concrete Composite Floor Diaphragms

Timeline: 
2017 - 2020

Project Lead: Andre Barbosa

Abstract: This project develops benchmark data needed to generate design guidelines for structural engineers to calculate strength & stiffness of CLT-diaphragms, with and without concrete toppings. The project includes a full-scale test of a two-story mass timber building at the UC San Diego shake table in collaboration with the larger project, “Development and Validation of a Resilience-based Seismic Design Methodology for Tall Wood Buildings” which features collaborators from throughout the western US and is funded by the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) program of the National Science Foundation.

Design of the Timber Pile Ground Improvement for Liquefaction Mitigations

Timeline: 
2017 - 2019
Project Lead: Armin Stuedlein
Abstract: Liquefaction caused damage to 25,000 homes in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan and $15 billion in losses in Christchurch in 2010-11. This project will propose design guidelines for the use of timber piles, a timber product widely-used for structural support of buildings, to mitigate against liquefaction hazards. This approach has application in protecting a broad range of other structures, including port and harbor facilities, bridge approach embankments, and bridge foundations. While significant field-based experimental research has been conducted by the PIs to-date, there does not exist a set of design guidelines to handle both the densification and reinforcement effect. The results of this research will be used by engineers who need to follow specific design guidelines to ensure that an appropriate liquefaction mitigation design can be provided. 

Living Lab at Peavy Hall: Structural Health Performance of Mass Timber Buildings

Timeline: 
2017 - 2020

Project Lead: Mariapaola Riggio

Abstract: Building on the results of an earlier project that established protocols for post-occupancy building monitoring, this project aims to install a system in the new Peavy Hall building at Oregon State University to monitor moisture, relative humidity, vertical and slip movements due to shrinkage and deflection, post-tensioning losses, vibration and seismic activity. The monitoring system will establish a "living" laboratory that demonstrates in real time how the mass timber components of the building are affected by various internal and external phenomena. The data will be gathered and analyzed over the service life of the building.

Structural Health Monitoring and Post-Occupancy Performance of Mass Timber Buildings

Timeline: 
( ? )

Project Lead: Mariapaola Riggio

Overview

Mass timber construction is still in its infancy in the U.S. and industry professionals aren’t sure how tall wood buildings perform over time in terms of durability and livability. To date, most research on cross-laminated timber (CLT) performance has focused on quantitative, lab- based measures, which have helped establish standards for manufacturing and construction. However, many questions remain about the behavior of full-scale CLT in mass timber buildings, including performance of the material over time and at different stages - from construction through service life. There is a need for both quantitative monitoring data as well as data about the subjective and qualitative performance of mass timber buildings, including post-occupancy feedback.

To address this gap, TDI researchers measured a wide range of performance indicators of CLT, both within a controlled laboratory setting and within occupied buildings outfitted with sensors. The goals were to generate monitoring protocols, acquire benchmark data about the holistic performance of CLT buildings (which will ultimately help define performance standards for CLT systems) and to explore how monitoring might reduce market barriers for CLT.